Organisations often have no clear ideas of what they want from team coaching, partly because there is no widely accepted definition of its purpose. However, it is important that everyone involved with the team coaching process including the sponsor, the leader, the team itself and the coach, have clarity as to what it is and the benefits it will bring. 
I recently conducted some research into the effectiveness of coaching in helping individuals overcome the Imposter Phenomenon. I have put two posts together summarising this research: the first is an explanation of what the Imposter Phenomenon is and the second are some tips to help individuals overcome some of the negative symptoms. 
 
Interim Management can be a highly rewarding and satisfying career choice. But what skills do you need to become an interim manager? This blog explores some key questions you need to ask yourself if you are considering becoming an interim manager. 
 
Where is your depth of expertise? It is absolutely vital as an interim that you understand where your depth of expertise lies. And by this I do not mean a list of job titles. Clients do not care what you were, only what problems you can solve for them, where you have ‘been there and done it before’. Make sure you have a clear understanding of this before you launch yourself as an interim. 
Use of self is a difficult concept to put in words, harder to put into action, and can be demonstrated more easily than described. However, it can be a very effective tool in a coach’s kit bag. Some coaches describe the use of self as simply self-disclosure, where personal information is shared by the coach to help understanding and the development of the coach/coachee relationship. 
 
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